Santos F.C.

Books

The Ball Is Round: A Global History of Soccer by David Goldblatt

There may be no cultural practice more global than soccer. Rites of birth and marriage are infinitely diverse, but the rules of soccer are universal. No world religion can match its geographical scope. The single greatest simultaneous human collective experience is the World Cup final. 

In this extraordinary tour de force, David Goldblatt tells the full story of soccer's rise from chaotic folk ritual to the world's most popular sport-now poised to fully establish itself in the USA. Already celebrated internationally, The Ball Is Round illuminates soccer's role in the political and social histories of modern societies, but never loses sight of the beauty, joy, and excitement of the game itself. 

 

Soccernomics by Simon Kuper

Soccernomics pioneers a new way of looking at soccer through meticulous, empirical analysis and incisive, witty commentary. The San Francisco Chronicle describes it as “the most intelligent book ever written about soccer.”

This World Cup edition features new material, including a provocative examination of how soccer clubs might actually start making profits, why that’s undesirable, and how soccer’s never had it so good.

 

 

 

Inverting The Pyramid by Jonathan Wilson

If you are looking to understand and further your knowledge of the tactical game, Jonathan Wilson is the best writer around. This book is one of the most accalimed soccer books, not only for the tactical breakdown but of the evolution of the game from the beginings to the modern era.  Wilson takes on formations, styles of play, defined eras, and all the moving pieces in an analytical and extremely precise way.

Through Jonathan Wilson’s brilliant historical detective work we learn how the South Americans shrugged off the British colonial order to add their own finesse to the game; how the Europeans harnessed individual technique and built it into a team structure; how the game once featured five forwards up front, while now a lone striker is not uncommon.  

 

 

Outcasts United:  A Refugee Team, an American Town by Warren St. John

The extraordinary tale of a refugee youth soccer team and the transformation of a small American town

Clarkston, Georgia, was a typical Southern town until it was designated a refugee settlement center in the 1990s, becoming the first American home for scores of families in flight from the world’s war zones—from Liberia and Sudan to Iraq and Afghanistan. Suddenly Clarkston’s streets were filled with women wearing the hijab, the smells of cumin and curry, and kids of all colors playing soccer in any open space they could find. The town also became home to Luma Mufleh, an American-educated Jordanian woman who founded a youth soccer team to unify Clarkston’ s refugee children and keep them off the streets. These kids named themselves the Fugees.

This fast-paced chronicle of a single season is a complex and inspiring tale of a small town becoming a global community—and an account of the ingenious and complicated ways we create a home in a changing world. 
 

 

*All and parts of summaries of books were provided by Amazon descriptions.